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8051 Microcontroller: Internals, Instructions, Programming & Interfacing - Ghoshal Subrata - Google Books


Subrata Ghoshal 8051.pdf: A Comprehensive Guide to the 8051 Microcontroller




If you are interested in learning about the 8051 microcontroller, one of the most popular and widely used microcontrollers in the world, you might have come across a book called Subrata Ghoshal 8051.pdf. This book, written by Subrata Ghoshal, a professor and an expert in embedded systems and robotics, is a comprehensive and practical guide to the internals, instructions, programming and interfacing of the 8051 microcontroller. In this article, we will give you an overview of what this book covers and why it is a valuable resource for anyone who wants to master the 8051 microcontroller.




Subrata Ghoshal 8051.pdf


Download File: https://www.google.com/url?q=https%3A%2F%2Furlcod.com%2F2ud0gw&sa=D&sntz=1&usg=AOvVaw1WJtFOWXEGEF-extQ0K508



What is Subrata Ghoshal 8051.pdf?




Subrata Ghoshal 8051.pdf is a PDF version of a book titled 8051 Microcontroller: Internals, Instructions, Programming & Interfacing, published by Pearson Education India in 2010. The book has 512 pages and contains 10 chapters that cover various aspects of the 8051 microcontroller, from its general architecture to its advanced applications. The book also includes several programming examples, exercises, appendices and bibliographic references to help the readers understand and practice the concepts discussed in the book.


Who is Subrata Ghoshal?




Subrata Ghoshal is a professor in the Embedded System Design Department of IIIT Pune. He has over 20 years of teaching experience at reputed institutes of higher education in India, including BITS Pilani, STCET Kolkata, and SMIT Sikkim. He has authored two books and has to his credit several technical papers published in India and abroad. He has also served as Guest Editor of the Robotics issue of CSI Communications (November, 2008). His research interests include robotics, artificial intelligence, and embedded system design.


Why is the 8051 microcontroller important?




The 8051 microcontroller is a single-chip microcomputer that was developed by Intel in 1980. It is based on an 8-bit CPU with integrated memory, ports, timers, interrupts and serial communication. The 8051 microcontroller is one of the most widely used microcontrollers in the world because of its low cost, high performance, versatility and ease of programming. The 8051 microcontroller can be used for a variety of applications such as embedded systems, robotics, automation, industrial control, consumer electronics, communication, security and more. The 8051 microcontroller is also the basis for many advanced microcontrollers that have enhanced features and capabilities.


General Architecture of the 8051 Microcontroller




The general architecture of the 8051 microcontroller consists of the following components:



  • CPU: The CPU is the brain of the microcontroller that executes the instructions and controls the operation of the microcontroller. The CPU has an 8-bit ALU (Arithmetic Logic Unit) that can perform arithmetic and logical operations on 8-bit data. The CPU also has a set of 8-bit registers that store data and addresses. The CPU can access two types of memory: program memory and data memory.



  • Memory: The memory is the storage area of the microcontroller that holds the instructions and data. The memory can be divided into two types: program memory and data memory. Program memory is used to store the program code that is executed by the CPU. Data memory is used to store the data that is manipulated by the CPU. The 8051 microcontroller has 4 KB of internal program memory and 128 bytes of internal data memory. The internal program memory can be expanded up to 64 KB and the internal data memory can be expanded up to 256 bytes using external memory chips.



  • Ports: The ports are the input/output interfaces of the microcontroller that connect it to the external devices. The 8051 microcontroller has four 8-bit ports: P0, P1, P2 and P3. Each port can be configured as an input or an output port by setting or clearing a bit in a register called PCON (Port Control Register). Each port can also be used for special functions such as address bus, data bus, serial communication, interrupts and timers.



  • Timers: The timers are the internal devices of the microcontroller that generate time delays or measure time intervals. The 8051 microcontroller has two 16-bit timers: T0 and T1. Each timer can operate in four modes: mode 0 (13-bit timer), mode 1 (16-bit timer), mode 2 (8-bit auto-reload timer) and mode 3 (split timer). The timers can be started, stopped, reset and read by setting or clearing bits in registers called TMOD (Timer Mode Register) and TCON (Timer Control Register).



  • Interrupts: The interrupts are the signals that cause the CPU to temporarily stop its normal execution and jump to a specific subroutine called an interrupt service routine (ISR). The interrupts can be generated by external sources or internal sources. The external sources are connected to two pins: INT0 and INT1. The internal sources are generated by timers, serial communication and port P3. The interrupts can be enabled, disabled, prioritized and serviced by setting or clearing bits in registers called IE (Interrupt Enable Register) and IP (Interrupt Priority Register).



  • Serial Communication: The serial communication is the feature that allows the microcontroller to communicate with other devices using a single wire for transmitting and receiving data. The 8051 microcontroller has a built-in serial port that can operate in four modes: mode 0 (shift register), mode 1 (8-bit UART), mode 2 (9-bit UART) and mode 3 (9-bit UART with variable baud rate). The serial communication can be controlled and monitored by setting or clearing bits in registers called SCON (Serial Control Register) and SBUF (Serial Buffer Register).



Instructions and Programming of the 8051 Microcontroller




The instructions and programming of the 8051 microcontroller involve the following topics:



  • Instruction Set: The instruction set is the collection of commands that the CPU can execute. The instruction set of the 8051 microcontroller consists of about 250 instructions that belong to three categories: arithmetic instructions, logical instructions and transfer instructions. Each instruction has a mnemonic name, an opcode, an operand size, a cycle count and a flag effect.



  • Addressing Modes: The addressing modes are the ways of specifying the operands for an instruction. The addressing modes of the 8051 microcontroller include immediate addressing, direct addressing, register addressing, register indirect addressing, indexed addressing and relative addressing.



  • Data Move Operations: The data move operations are the instructions that transfer data from one location to another. The data move operations of the 8051 microcontroller include MOV (move), MOVC (move code), MOVX (move external), PUSH (push), POP (pop), XCH (exchange) and XCHD (exchange digit).



  • Logical Operations: The logical operations are the instructions that perform bitwise operations on data. The logical operations of the 8051 microcontroller include ANL (and), ORL (or), XRL (exclusive or), CLR (clear), CPL (complement), RL (rotate left), RLC (rotate left through carry), RR (rotate right), RRC (rotate right through carry) and SWAP (swap nibbles).



  • Boolean Variable Manipulation: The boolean variable manipulation is the feature that allows the CPU to access and modify individual bits in memory. The boolean variable manipulation of the 8051 microcontroller includes SETB (set bit), CLR (clear bit), CPL (complement bit), ANL (and bit), ORL (or bit) and MOV (move bit).



  • Branching and Looping: The branching and looping are the instructions that alter the normal sequence of execution of the program. The branching and looping of the 8051 microcontroller include SJMP (short jump), LJMP (long jump), AJMP (absolute jump), JMP (jump indirect), JZ (jump if zero), JNZ (jump if not zero), JC (jump if carry), JNC (jump if not carry), JB (jump if bit set), JNB (jump if bit not set), JBC (jump if bit set and clear) and DJNZ (decrement and jump if not zero).



  • Subroutines and Stack: The subroutines and stack are the features that allow the CPU to call and return from a separate section of code. The subroutines and stack of the 8051 microcontroller include ACALL (absolute call), LCALL (long call), RET (return) and RETI (return from interrupt). The stack is a section of data memory that stores the return addresses of the subroutines and interrupts. The stack pointer is a register that points to the top of the stack.



Interfacing and Applications of the 8051 Microcontroller




The interfacing and applications of the 8051 microcontroller involve the following topics:



  • External Memory: The external memory is the memory that is connected to the microcontroller through external pins. The external memory can be used to expand the program memory or data memory of the microcontroller. The external memory can be accessed by using special instructions such as MOVC, MOVX, LJMP and LCALL.



  • Keyboards: The keyboards are the input devices that allow the user to enter data or commands to the microcontroller. The keyboards can be interfaced to the microcontroller using ports or special circuits such as encoders, decoders or multiplexers.



  • Display Devices: The display devices are the output devices that allow the microcontroller to show data or messages to the user. The display devices can be interfaced to the microcontroller using ports or special circuits such as drivers, latches or shift registers. The display devices can be classified into two types: alphanumeric displays and graphical displays.



  • DAC/ADC: The DAC/ADC are the devices that convert analog signals to digital signals or vice versa. The DAC/ADC can be used to interface analog sensors or actuators to the microcontroller. The DAC/ADC can be internal or external to the microcontroller.



  • DC Motor: The DC motor is a device that converts electrical energy to mechanical energy. The DC motor can be used to control the speed or direction of a robot or a vehicle. The DC motor can be interfaced to the microcontroller using ports or special circuits such as H-bridge, PWM or PID.



  • Stepper Motor: The stepper motor is a device that converts electrical pulses to discrete angular movements. The stepper motor can be used to control the position or angle of a robot or a device. The stepper motor can be interfaced to the microcontroller using ports or special circuits such as drivers, controllers or sequencers.



  • Servomotor: The servomotor is a device that consists of a DC motor, a gearbox and a feedback mechanism. The servomotor can be used to control the position or angle of a robot or a device with high accuracy and precision. The servomotor can be interfaced to the microcontroller using ports or special circuits such as PWM or PID.



  • Power Management: The power management is the feature that allows the microcontroller to reduce its power consumption or extend its battery life. The power management of the 8051 microcontroller includes two modes: idle mode and power-down mode. The idle mode stops the CPU clock but keeps the peripherals active. The power-down mode stops the CPU clock and the peripherals but retains the RAM contents.



  • A Home Protection System: A home protection system is an example of an application that uses the 8051 microcontroller to monitor and control the security of a home. A home protection system can use various sensors such as infrared, ultrasonic, magnetic, smoke, fire, etc. to detect intruders, fire, gas leak, etc. A home protection system can also use various actuators such as buzzer, siren, light, relay, etc. to alert the user or take appropriate actions.



Advanced Microcontrollers Based on the 8051 Architecture




The advanced microcontrollers based on the 8051 architecture are the microcontrollers that have improved features and capabilities compared to the original 8051 microcontroller. The advanced microcontrollers based on the 8051 architecture include the following topics:



  • Features and Benefits of Advanced Microcontrollers: The features and benefits of advanced microcontrollers include higher clock speed, larger memory size, more ports, more timers, more interrupts, more serial communication modes, more instruction set extensions, more addressing modes, more data types, more power management modes, more analog and digital peripherals, more security and encryption features, etc.



  • Examples of Advanced Microcontrollers: The examples of advanced microcontrollers based on the 8051 architecture include AT89C51 (Atmel), P89C51 (Philips), DS89C4x0 (Dallas), C8051Fxxx (Silicon Labs), MSP430 (Texas Instruments), PIC16Fxxx (Microchip), etc.



Conclusion




In this article, we have given you an overview of what Subrata Ghoshal 8051.pdf covers and why it is a valuable resource for anyone who wants to master the 8051 microcontroller. We have discussed the general architecture, instructions and programming, interfacing and applications, and advanced microcontrollers based on the 8051 architecture. We hope that this article has sparked your interest in learning more about the 8051 microcontroller and Subrata Ghoshal's book. If you want to download Subrata Ghoshal 8051.pdf for free, you can visit this link: https://www.academia.edu/38225058/8051_Microcontroller_Subrata_Ghoshal.


FAQs




Here are some frequently asked questions about Subrata Ghoshal 8051.pdf and the 8051 microcontroller:



  • Q: What is the difference between a microcontroller and a microprocessor?



  • A: A microcontroller is a single-chip microcomputer that has a CPU, memory, ports and peripherals integrated on one chip. A microprocessor is a single-chip CPU that needs external memory, ports and peripherals to function as a microcomputer.



  • Q: What are the advantages of using a microcontroller over a microprocessor?



  • A: Some of the advantages of using a microcontroller over a microprocessor are lower cost, smaller size, lower power consumption, higher reliability, easier programming and debugging, and higher integration.



  • Q: What are some of the applications of the 8051 microcontroller?



  • A: Some of the applications of the 8051 microcontroller are embedded systems, robotics, automation, industrial control, consumer electronics, communication, security and more.



  • Q: How can I program the 8051 microcontroller?



  • A: You can program the 8051 microcontroller using assembly language or high-level languages such as C or BASIC. You need a software tool such as an assembler or a compiler to convert your source code into machine code. You also need a hardware tool such as a programmer or a debugger to transfer your machine code into the program memory of the microcontroller.



  • Q: Where can I find more resources on learning about the 8051 microcontroller?



  • A: You can find more resources on learning about the 8051 microcontroller by visiting these websites:



  • https://www.8051projects.net/: A website that provides tutorials, projects, downloads and forums on the 8051 microcontroller.



  • https://www.electronicwings.com/8051: A website that provides basics, interfacing, programming and projects on the 8051 microcontroller.



  • https://www.circuitstoday.com/category/8051: A website that provides circuits, programs and articles on the 8051 microcontroller.



I hope you enjoyed reading this article and learned something new. If you have any questions or feedback, please feel free to leave a comment below. Thank you for your time and attention. 71b2f0854b


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